Saturday, May 13, 2006

A Trip Down Memory Lane: Stage 1

The Lady Exile and I are going home to Detroit in a couple of weeks for some wedding planning obligations over Memorial Day weekend. It's another one of those life-changing points that have been filling my life of late. Thankfully, all of these changes have been much for the better.


As chance would have it, I am starting to get addicted to YouTube, especially since I started noticing the incredible amount of content on there that takes me back to my childhood.


So, over the next couple of weeks, I will have some links up to videos that make me think of life before Boston.



This was a commercial for the Detroit Zoo that aired during the early- and mid-1980s. When I rediscovered it the other night, neither of us had seen this ad in the better part of twenty years.

And yet!

We still knew the commercial almost by heart.

Funny how that works....

Friday, May 12, 2006

Clinton vs. Bush

If the Middle America Progressive says word one about this poll, he cedes any moral authority he might ever have had calling out conservative who still note the shortcomings of the Clinton presidency.


I wonder if he's willing to abdicate a frequent bargaining chip.


Also, the poll respondents think Bush Clinton is more honest by a five point margin.  Apparently, authentic corroboration on tape is only slightly more damning than no authenticated corroboration at all.*  Who knew that Americans would trust a confirmed liar over, at worst, an unconfirmed one?


(And just to foreclose the inevitable attempts to distinguish the two: the poll only asked which man the respondent trusted more.  It made no attempt to draw out the sources of these decisions or any distance between them on individual trust spectrums.)


I do wonder about the usefulness of this poll.  Year five of the Clinton presidency was 1998.  The independent counsel investigation was only at its midpoint and he had not yet been impeached.  While Clinton's approval rating never dipped below the mid-fifties in the second term, two points are overlooked: he was a peacetime president (or at the least he was not running an unpopular war -- the occasional airstrike doesn't count) and his approval ratings had also previously been in the mid-thirties.  Also, Clinton peaked in the mid-seventies.  I'm not suggesting that I think it is likely that Bush, too, will enjoy a 20-point bump before the end of his presidency, but I'm also not placing it entirely outside of the realm of possibility.


In other words, the poll is interesting, I suppose, as far as it goes.  But call me again in another 8 years.  At least then we'll know how the Bush presidency ended and we'll have a little perspective.


*Thanks to Kathy for noting my typo, though it only serves to underscore my conclusion, not undermine it.


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Wednesday, May 10, 2006

Dispatch from the Battlefield

This is one of those rare occasions where I will blog about work.  For obvious reasons (as well as not-so-obvious ones), the details will be scarce.  However, it is not the content of what I encountered today that matters as much as how that information struck me.


In the course of starting an incredibly daunting document review today, I pulled up a copy of the complaint we filed in this products liability case.


(For those who are curious, a complaint is the document that essentially starts a lawsuit and is the first one you file in court.  All it really does is name the plaintiff and defendant(s) and put everyone on notice about what kind of suit you are filing.  That's it.  No evidence.  No offer of proof.  All you have to do is tell who you are suing that you are suing them and what the claim is.  If you want to wait until a little later to tell them "why" you are suing them (and flesh out the facts of your case more), go for it.  At least that's how it works in most states and in the federal system.)


Usually, the second paragraph of your complaint describes your defendant.  Today, I encountered the following (ID information removed for privacy purposes):



[X Corporation] is a Delaware corporation with its principal place of business at [Address], Detroit, Michigan.



I stopped short because, well, let's just say I had heard of this company.  And that I had seen their headquarters, what with growing up near there.


Wouldn't it be nice if I could combine business with a trip home to see the folks?